Don't most headphone amplifiers feature linear output stages? Class D seems like an interesting choice for a headphone amplifier, can you please elaborate?

Parents
  • +1
    •  Analog Employees 
    on May 13, 2021 8:47 AM

    While it is true that Class D is not a traditional choice for driving headphones with 3.5mm jacks, we spent considerable design effort optimizing our technology around the wireless headphone use case.  In particular, our power stage is designed to be more efficient than linear output stages even at very low playback levels.  Our A-weighted noise floor is incredibly low so that even the most sensitive drivers will sound clean during in-ear playback.  On top of that, the die area and total passive component footprint is dramatically smaller than what is used for linear output amplifiers.

Reply
  • +1
    •  Analog Employees 
    on May 13, 2021 8:47 AM

    While it is true that Class D is not a traditional choice for driving headphones with 3.5mm jacks, we spent considerable design effort optimizing our technology around the wireless headphone use case.  In particular, our power stage is designed to be more efficient than linear output stages even at very low playback levels.  Our A-weighted noise floor is incredibly low so that even the most sensitive drivers will sound clean during in-ear playback.  On top of that, the die area and total passive component footprint is dramatically smaller than what is used for linear output amplifiers.

Children
No Data