Sinusoidal Phase Modulation with ADL5390

Hi,

I am trying to perform up to 10MHz phase modulation on a 1.56GHz clock signal.  

I was looking at the ADL5390 and it seems like it can do this as long as the IQ signals amplitude are properly controlled, but I am not sure

1. Is the ADL5390 capable of modulation at this frequency?

2. can it accept a square wave a the input to be phase shifted? or only sine waves?

3a. what is the best way to setup continuous sinusoidal modulation using the IQ channels?

3b. what part might be good fit to control the IQ signal amplitudes in the desired fashion?

Thanks,

Rudy 

Parents
  • +1
    •  Analog Employees 
    on Sep 22, 2020 7:29 PM 3 months ago
    1. The baseband inputs DC coupled and have greater than 200 MHz bandwidth signals applied, so 10 MHz should be fine.
    2. The ADL5390 is a vector modulators, so there is an in-phase input and quadrature input.  The phase change is due summation of these vectors.  You will need to use an external 90-splitter to get your signal into quadrature.  I don't know if this is the best way of doing this.  The RF path in band limited to about 2.4GHz.  This will attenuate any high frequency  content you have on your clock signal.
      1.  I don't think I quite understand the question. As long as you proved a differential signal, and if DC coupling a signal with common-mode at 0.5V, or a single ended single referenced to to 0.5V, the part will be happy.
      2. I'm sure there are differential DAC pairs that will provide sine wave outputs.  You might want to post a question on the converter area of engineer zone
Reply
  • +1
    •  Analog Employees 
    on Sep 22, 2020 7:29 PM 3 months ago
    1. The baseband inputs DC coupled and have greater than 200 MHz bandwidth signals applied, so 10 MHz should be fine.
    2. The ADL5390 is a vector modulators, so there is an in-phase input and quadrature input.  The phase change is due summation of these vectors.  You will need to use an external 90-splitter to get your signal into quadrature.  I don't know if this is the best way of doing this.  The RF path in band limited to about 2.4GHz.  This will attenuate any high frequency  content you have on your clock signal.
      1.  I don't think I quite understand the question. As long as you proved a differential signal, and if DC coupling a signal with common-mode at 0.5V, or a single ended single referenced to to 0.5V, the part will be happy.
      2. I'm sure there are differential DAC pairs that will provide sine wave outputs.  You might want to post a question on the converter area of engineer zone
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