Calculate Coefficients of Chebyshev and Notch-Filters

Hi everybody,

 

i have a question about the calculation of Chebyshev or Notch cofficients b0, b1, b2, a1 and a2. Where can i find the calculation? I've been looking in the SigmaStudio-Help but i found nothing about this topic.

 

 

 

Kind Regards

Eric

  • 0
    •  Super User 
    on Nov 3, 2015 10:35 PM

         Hello Eric,

         From your question I'm assuming you're planning to have a microcontroller figure or lookup coefficients and safeload them into your filters at run time.  Otherwise, you need not handle coefficients yourself -- you could just enter the desired filter specs into SigmaStudio's General and Nth-Order Filters (the latter is not available yet for ADAU145x).  If you do need to figure your own coefficients, you can calculate them using ordinary tools -- the process is a bit tedious but relatively straightforward.

         Calculating Chebyshev IIR coefficients is a several-step process.  The first is to figure how many first-order and/or second-order stages you'll need to implement your desired response.  This being analog theory (going back to the days of tubes!), you won't likely find it in DSP circles.   Fortunately, ADI has a surprisingly good Web app which can help you with this.  Please refer to https://ez.analog.com/message/225675#225675  for a link to this, as well as how to use it.

         Once you have the gains, frequencies, and Q's for your filter stages, you could calculate each stage's IIR coefficients with a spreadsheet.  Brett G. made the original one found at:  Calculating Filter Coefficients to Store in a Microcontroller

    I have expanded it to cover more filter types at:  https://ez.analog.com/message/160192#160192

         The final step is to convert the coefficients to a form suitable for safeloading.  The tutorial at

    https://ez.analog.com/message/61175#61175

    is helpful for this.

         Best regards,

         Bob

  • Hello Bob,

    thank you for the quick response. Yes, i'm planning to calculate coefficents with a microcontroller by using the Parameters Frequency, Gain, Boost etc and safeload them into the filters at run time.That ist for most Filtertypes no Problem because i have the calculation specification (Picture1 LowPass for example). My Problem is, that i can't find the calculation specification for Filtertypes like Chebyshev or Notch-Filters (Picture2).

    Picture1

    Picture2

    Kind Regards

    Eric

  • 0
    •  Super User 
    on Nov 6, 2015 4:11 PM

         Hello Eric,

         Sorry my reply wasn't on-target.  Hopefully we can come closer to what you're looking for:

    • Notch filter -- Unfortunately I had linked you to an older version of my spreadsheet which did not include notch filters.  The correct one is attached below.  The notch filter calculations are near the right end of the sheet.  Clicking on the cells reveals the formulas for coding in your uC compiler.  These formulas are necessarily more complex than those for the lowpass example.  If it doesn't work right away, remember that SigmaDSPs  need the signs of their a coefficients flipped.
    • Chebyshev filter -- Now I see what you're looking for!  Perhaps FormerMember may be in position to track down the Second Order (single biquad) Chebyshev formulas since he works with the SigmaStudio programmers at ADI.  I do see a way to figure them out myself, but the needed research and math will result in a delayed response.

         Best regards,

         Bob

  • Hello Bob,

    many thanks for your quick reply. Your calculator is a big help for calculating Notch Filters. I hope you can figure out the Chebyshev formulas yourself. That would be a big help.

     

    Kind Regards

    Eric

  • 0
    •  Super User 
    on Nov 7, 2015 9:02 PM

        Hello Eric,

        As it turns out, the math behind Chebyshev filters is quite imposing.  Fortunately, the one you've shown as an example above is of the second-order ("one biquad", or "N = 2") variety.  This is a special case of Chebyshev filters generally, thus possibly allowing a shortcut around the math.  I'll present such a shortcut, then provide a reference for the (gasp!) real deal.

        Below is the SigmaStudio Chebyshev Lowpass filter above a General HP-LP Lowpass Filter.  Both are second-order.  Comparing the red Chebyshev response to the green General response, we observe the mismatch in their curves:

        By manually tweaking the General Filter's Gain, Frequency, and Q, we can make the two curves line up nicely.  This works because second-order lowpass filters have only these three parameters, which completely describe the resulting filter:

    By now, likely you see where this is going:  For a range of second-order Chebyshev filters of commonly-used ripple choices, we can empirically find corresponding gains, frequency factors, and Qs to plug into a General Second-Order filter.  Here's my results:

    You can code these into a lookup table for your uC.  Then have it compute your IIR coefficients using the known general lowpass formulas.

        Does this method really work?  As a quick test, I tried applying the lookup table to a 100 Hz, 1 dB ripple Chebyshev highpass filter.  For highpass, you divide by the frequency factor instead of multiplying.  The simulated results appear pretty stinking close!  Somewhere there's a filter expert laughing their tail off at this amateur stuff as we speak -- but if they won't jump in here and help us, the shame is on them!

        The real magic with Chebyshev is in the higher-order implementations.  These provide the "brick-wall" responses which communications engineers often demand.  The good news is, the reference below provides a BASIC-like example program to make this very magic happen.  It's straightforward, a walk in the park.  But those formulas do appear large and hungry, like in Jurassic Park.   Choose for yourself whether to venture therein:

    http://www.analog.com/media/en/technical-documentation/dsp-book/dsp_book_Ch20.pdf

    This is part of an entire DSP book which its author and ADI kindly make available as a download.  If you happen to be a DSP novice like me, by all means devour this book!  It's quite accessible as these things go, and nicely arranged in topical order from easy to harder.  Chebyshev filters are way back in Chapter 20, another hint of what you'll be getting into.  Enjoy the ride -- and if something chases you, run!

        Best regards,

        Bob