Sigmastudio GPIO controls the opening, muting and closing of audio signals

I want to use the button with self-locking function to realize the mute and open control of audio signal in sigmastudio. The button press the audio signal to open and pass, and the button flips the mute or cut-off of the audio signal.

External self-locking keys combined with internal GPIO real-time audio signal control.

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  • 0
    •  Super User 
    on Oct 23, 2019 10:29 PM over 1 year ago

         Hello,

         The Mute blocks have only a GUI control -- click a check-mark in their boxes to mute the sound.  To control sound by GPIO, you need blocks with control input pins.  The Slew External Volume Control blocks shown below will do the trick:

         The number in the slew box determines the response time -- "12" provides a rather slow rise and fall of the sound, while "6" is quite fast.  In addition to the schematic, you'll need to set up your MP pins for GPIO input -- this differs for each DSP model.

          Best regards,

         Bob

  • Dear JBob

    (vocal Chorus) / (flange) algorithm, not in adau1452 algorithm list, can you provide me a routine for learning? I am using adau1452 to design an effector for guitar.

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  • 0
    •  Super User 
    on Oct 27, 2019 7:25 PM over 1 year ago in reply to jamesli.2018@outlook.com

         Hello James,

         Which SigmaDSP chips support which functions depends on both the capability of the particular DSP, but also upon what the ADI programmers have spent time to implement.  For example, the humble ADAU1701 lacks enough delay memory for a convincing reverb (unless you pull a trick like this).  It does, however, feature a chorus effect.  The far more capable ADAU1452 has reverb, yet no chorus.  Thus, we'll need to make our own.

         To get you started, this Wikipedia article describes how a chorus effect works.  The circuit below is a simple implementation, upon which you're free to improve.  Its heart is the voltage-variable delay.  With a 1.0 input its delay is as shown, while proportionately less with smaller inputs.  Two low-frequency oscillators add a small modulation to a DC source of 0.95.  Feeding the delay's two control inputs, they result in two copies of the original signal with slightly and slowly varying pitches and delays.  Mixing them together produces the chorus effect.

    As the Wikipedia article describes, a flanger is similar except for longer delays, and with a fraction of the output signal fed back to the input.  Have fun making your effects!

         Best regards,

         Bob

    Chorus_1452.zip