Choose first DSP - processing guitar signal

Hi,

I'd like to get started using DSPs. And as I'm a guitarplayer I thought a guitar effect would be a great point to start.

I won't start with an expensive DSP like the TigerSharc (Fractal Audio's Axe FX II) or an ADSP-21469 (Line6 Helix or Fractal's AX8) - tough I like the specs of both of them .
But I want to play around with

  • EQing
  • modulation filters
  • compression
  • reverb
  • delay
  • bandfilters
  • maybe later even a looper (using some external memory)

I need the DSP to be at least 24bit 96kHz.

I've read an ADAU1701 would be a nice and cheap device to get startet. But it lacks of memory, why it's not usable for a reverb. An ADAU1452 shall have enough memory for an reverb but lacks of ADC and DAC. Then some guys told me the ADAU1452 wouldn't be a generalpurpose DSP.

So I wonder which DSP to choose.

For delay/looper I'd like to add external ram later on, when I know what I do. But I'd like my first board to be able the rest of the effects.
Also I'd like it to be a newer device which is not EOL, soon.

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  • 0
    •  Super User 
    on Jun 19, 2018 8:50 PM

       David, thanks for mentioning me!  I agree that the -1701 is the best place to start, even though it can't do everything on Mike's list.  Many of us have cut our SigmaDSP teeth with this one.  With built-in converters, self-boot and GPIOs, it's self-contained and easy to work with.  And we can do amazing things with it.  Getting as much as will fit from its capabilities is half the fun.

       Mike, we know that everyone in the business brags about their bit depth and sample rate.  You'll find the ADAU1701 somewhat limited when running a 96K sample rate -- where it can perform only about 500 instructions per sample, half of what it does at 48K.  The good news is that the Sigma-Delta converters and other design features of the -1701 make the most of 48K -- the chip sounds quite good there.  And with the average guitar speaker topping off at 5 KHz, a 96K rate yields diminishing returns.  In short, you'll have a lot more fun working with the -1701 at 48K.

       Best regards,

       Bob

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  • 0
    •  Super User 
    on Jun 19, 2018 8:50 PM

       David, thanks for mentioning me!  I agree that the -1701 is the best place to start, even though it can't do everything on Mike's list.  Many of us have cut our SigmaDSP teeth with this one.  With built-in converters, self-boot and GPIOs, it's self-contained and easy to work with.  And we can do amazing things with it.  Getting as much as will fit from its capabilities is half the fun.

       Mike, we know that everyone in the business brags about their bit depth and sample rate.  You'll find the ADAU1701 somewhat limited when running a 96K sample rate -- where it can perform only about 500 instructions per sample, half of what it does at 48K.  The good news is that the Sigma-Delta converters and other design features of the -1701 make the most of 48K -- the chip sounds quite good there.  And with the average guitar speaker topping off at 5 KHz, a 96K rate yields diminishing returns.  In short, you'll have a lot more fun working with the -1701 at 48K.

       Best regards,

       Bob

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