Choose first DSP - processing guitar signal

Hi,

I'd like to get started using DSPs. And as I'm a guitarplayer I thought a guitar effect would be a great point to start.

I won't start with an expensive DSP like the TigerSharc (Fractal Audio's Axe FX II) or an ADSP-21469 (Line6 Helix or Fractal's AX8) - tough I like the specs of both of them .
But I want to play around with

  • EQing
  • modulation filters
  • compression
  • reverb
  • delay
  • bandfilters
  • maybe later even a looper (using some external memory)

I need the DSP to be at least 24bit 96kHz.

I've read an ADAU1701 would be a nice and cheap device to get startet. But it lacks of memory, why it's not usable for a reverb. An ADAU1452 shall have enough memory for an reverb but lacks of ADC and DAC. Then some guys told me the ADAU1452 wouldn't be a generalpurpose DSP.

So I wonder which DSP to choose.

For delay/looper I'd like to add external ram later on, when I know what I do. But I'd like my first board to be able the rest of the effects.
Also I'd like it to be a newer device which is not EOL, soon.

Parents
  • 0
    •  Analog Employees 
    on Jun 19, 2018 7:51 PM

    Hello newmike,

    The ADAU1701 is a perfect platform to start with. You have a lot of things to learn about so starting with a simpler device is best to make the pain a little less. The converters built in simplifies the design. Yes, you cannot do a great reverb but you can do something. Check out 's posts and this one shows how to do a reverb with the 1701. https://ez.analog.com/thread/95200-guitar-reverb-and-adau-1701

    You can get familiar with the programming tool and how to use it. The 1701 is a great platform for this.

    Then after you can graduate to the 1452 family.

    Whoever told you that the ADAU1452 would not be a general purpose DSP is correct. It is not a general purpose DSP, it is designed for audio use and that last time I checked a guitar is still an audio device. (I guess unless it is a MIDI guitar! ). Since it is designed for audio use it is well suited for use to process audio, it does it fast and the GUI programming tool makes it easy. The Software is free and the USBi programmer comes with any of our evaluation boards.

    If you go with a general purpose DSP then the costs of development will be much higher and the complexity is far greater. The SigmaDSP line has been so good for simplifying audio specific DSP applications.

    Also learn how to use this forum and how to search older posts. There is a lot on the forum to help you.

    Enjoy!

    Dave T

Reply
  • 0
    •  Analog Employees 
    on Jun 19, 2018 7:51 PM

    Hello newmike,

    The ADAU1701 is a perfect platform to start with. You have a lot of things to learn about so starting with a simpler device is best to make the pain a little less. The converters built in simplifies the design. Yes, you cannot do a great reverb but you can do something. Check out 's posts and this one shows how to do a reverb with the 1701. https://ez.analog.com/thread/95200-guitar-reverb-and-adau-1701

    You can get familiar with the programming tool and how to use it. The 1701 is a great platform for this.

    Then after you can graduate to the 1452 family.

    Whoever told you that the ADAU1452 would not be a general purpose DSP is correct. It is not a general purpose DSP, it is designed for audio use and that last time I checked a guitar is still an audio device. (I guess unless it is a MIDI guitar! ). Since it is designed for audio use it is well suited for use to process audio, it does it fast and the GUI programming tool makes it easy. The Software is free and the USBi programmer comes with any of our evaluation boards.

    If you go with a general purpose DSP then the costs of development will be much higher and the complexity is far greater. The SigmaDSP line has been so good for simplifying audio specific DSP applications.

    Also learn how to use this forum and how to search older posts. There is a lot on the forum to help you.

    Enjoy!

    Dave T

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