2010-09-28 14:28:35     Windows/Linux SAMBA out of synch?

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2010-09-28 14:28:35     Windows/Linux SAMBA out of synch?

Wojtek Skulski (UNITED STATES)

Message: 93927   

 

Hi:

 

so now I have SAMBA working between a WinXP and Blackfin Linux board. An I am seeing the file content is out of synch between the two systems. I created an ASCII file "test.txt" under Windows. I am writing to that file with Notepad. I am adding new text, saving to disk under Windows, closing Notepad just to be sure, and doing cat under Linux. The newly added text not necessarily appears on the Linux side. It seems to appear in "jumps" when I make a more substantial change. I have not identified the exact pattern yet, what exactly needs to be done for the text to appear.

 

Question: is some sort of buffering implemented between the two systems? If so, how to flush these buffers to regain synchronization between the files?

 

Here is an example. The content of the file under Windows is shown first, and then the "cat" under Linux.

 

Windows content copy-pasted from Notepad (freshly opened to make sure it was read from disk):

 

Line 1. test document for blackfin mounting via smb

Line 2. ===========================================

Line 3.

Line 4. This file lives under Windows in "My documents"\test

Line 5.

Line 6. Now I am adding new text to this file.

Line 7.

Line 8.

Line 9. bla bla bla

Line A.

 

 

Now the corresponding "cat" from under Linux shows that "bla bla bla" in Line 9 is missing.

 

root:/etc/config> cat /mnt/test.txt

Line 1. test document for blackfin mounting via smb

Line 2. ===========================================

Line 3.

Line 4. This file lives under Windows in "My documents"\test

Line 5.

Line 6. Now I am adding new text to this file.

Line 7.

Line 8.

Line 9.

Line A.

root:/etc/config>

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2010-09-28 14:37:10     Re: Windows/Linux SAMBA out of synch?

Mike Frysinger (UNITED STATES)

Message: 93929   

 

you didnt say which system was mounting which.  if the blackfin mounts the windows system, only the kernel fs driver is in play, so the userspace versions on the blackfin board are irrelevant.

 

in general though, we really dont have anything to do with samba's development

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2010-09-28 14:48:38     Re: Windows/Linux SAMBA out of synch?

Wojtek Skulski (UNITED STATES)

Message: 93930   

 

Mike:

 

I issued the mount from the Linux side as follows. Even though I do not expect you folks doing samba, but the community are reading these messages. Perhaps it is a well-known problem to someone. It looks most weird to me, but perhaps I am not the first one to get bitten. Any hints will be appreciated.

 

The mount was done as follows. On the Windows side I created a shared folder. Then on the Linux side I edited config file per Wiki instructions. Then I issued the mount command under Linux. The name of the Windows computer was not recognized, but the IP worked. That's fine for now. I started testing and I saw the file content was out of synch. That's not OK.

 

root:/etc/config> cat smb.conf

[global]

workgroup = MSHOME

encrypt passwords = yes

root:/etc/config>

root:/etc/config> smbmount //169.254.144.144/test /mnt -o username=wsku

Password:

smbfs is deprecated and will be removed from the 2.6.27 kernel. Please migrate to cifs

root:/etc/config>

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2010-09-28 15:43:06     Re: Windows/Linux SAMBA out of synch?

Mike Frysinger (UNITED STATES)

Message: 93932   

 

my point is that the userspace code running on the blackfin board is irrelevant in this setup.  it isnt like the samba userspace code needs updating (we arent using the very latest) to resolve the issue.

 

along those lines, smb.conf has no meaning.  it used by the samba server, but you arent running one on the blackfin board.

 

you could delete all the blackfin caches via /proc/sys/vm/drop_caches on the board, but if that doesnt fix anything, i doubt you'll get anywhere with smbfs.  the kernel has marked it as dead and the maintainers arent interested in fixing it.

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2010-09-28 16:22:24     Re: Windows/Linux SAMBA out of synch?

Wojtek Skulski (UNITED STATES)

Message: 93933   

 

Mike:

 

I went for lunch. After I came back, the "bla bla bla" is now visible at the Linux side. So eventually the cache (or whatever that was) got flushed.

 

I am not married to smbfs. My goal is to exchange files with Windows. I will experiment with cifs. I read the threads and took home that cifs is having some problems. So I started with samba, which according to the previous discussions was working, while cifs was not. I will use whatever is working. I need to find out what is working and then stick to it.

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2010-09-28 16:27:20     Re: Windows/Linux SAMBA out of synch?

Mike Frysinger (UNITED STATES)

Message: 93934   

 

they probably both have bugs.  it's up to you to find out which set you can live with.

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2010-09-28 22:11:05     Re: Windows/Linux SAMBA out of synch?

Wojtek Skulski (UNITED STATES)

Message: 93939   

 

> they probably both have bugs.

 

That is definitely true. I umounted samba and tried to remount under cifs, in order to test the latter. The result is given below. So I think I will stay with SAMBA for now and stay away from CIFS.

 

root:/> smbumount /mnt     

SMB connection re-established (-5)

root:/> ls /mnt

 

root:/> mount.cifs //169.254.144.144/test /mnt -o username=wsku

Password:

Data access misaligned address violation

- Attempted misaligned data memory or data cache access.

Kernel OOPS in progress

Deferred Exception context

CURRENT PROCESS:

COMM=cifsd PID=200

CPU = 0

invalid mm

return address: [0x000b2f14]; contents of:

0x000b2ef0:  0024  4f09  3209  6539  5a91  6d2a  9510  5008

0x000b2f00:  0010  0000  3210  e491  0024  4f09  3209  6539

0x000b2f10:  5a91  6d2a [9510] 5008  0010  0000  e142  51eb

0x000b2f20:  e102  851f  c080  180a  c683  5180  c111  860a

 

ADSP-BF561-0.5 200(MHz CCLK) 100(MHz SCLK) (mpu off)

Linux version 2.6.28.10-ADI-2009R1.1

Built with gcc version 4.1.2 (ADI svn)

 

SEQUENCER STATUS:               Not tainted

SEQSTAT: 00000024  IPEND: 8030  SYSCFG: 0006

  EXCAUSE   : 0x24

  interrupts disabled

  physical IVG5 asserted : <0xffa00cd4> { _evt_ivhw + 0x0 }

  physical IVG15 asserted : <0xffa00ff8> { _evt_system_call + 0x0 }

  logical irq   6 mapped  : <0xffa00424> { _timer_interrupt + 0x0 }

  logical irq  35 mapped  : <0x000e9abc> { _bfin_serial_dma_rx_int + 0x0 }

  logical irq  36 mapped  : <0x000e9c9c> { _bfin_serial_dma_tx_int + 0x0 }

  logical irq  82 mapped  : <0x000f1730> { _ax88180_interrupt + 0x0 }

RETE: <0x00000000> /* Maybe null pointer? */

RETN: <0x03675f10> /* kernel dynamic memory */

RETX: <0x00000480> /* Maybe fixed code section */

RETS: <0x000b24e6> { _checkSMB + 0x1d2 }

PC  : <0x000b2f14> { _smbCalcSize_LE + 0x10 }

DCPLB_FAULT_ADDR: <0x03509086> /* kernel dynamic memory */

ICPLB_FAULT_ADDR: <0x000b2f14> { _smbCalcSize_LE + 0x10 }

 

PROCESSOR STATE:

R0 : 03509040    R1 : 00000049    R2 : 00000001    R3 : 00000b68

R4 : 03509040    R5 : 00000001    R6 : 00000069    R7 : 00000065

P0 : 03509040    P1 : 00000022    P2 : 03509087    P3 : 03674000

P4 : 03674000    P5 : 03509040    FP : 0351f200    SP : 03675e34

LB0: ffa015e8    LT0: ffa015e6    LC0: 00000000

LB1: 000f156a    LT1: 000f154a    LC1: 00000000

B0 : 00000000    L0 : 00000000    M0 : 00000000    I0 : 2c00fc14

B1 : 00000000    L1 : 00000000    M1 : 00000000    I1 : 0351f0bc

B2 : 00000000    L2 : 00000000    M2 : 00000000    I2 : 00000000

B3 : 00000000    L3 : 00000000    M3 : 00000000    I3 : 00000000

A0.w: 00001ce3   A0.x: 00000000   A1.w: 0000000e   A1.x: 00000000

USP : 00000000  ASTAT: 02002020

 

Hardware Trace:

   0 Target : <0x00005194> { _trap_c + 0x0 }

     Source : <0xffa00716> { _exception_to_level5 + 0xae } CALL pcrel

   1 Target : <0xffa00668> { _exception_to_level5 + 0x0 }

     Source : <0xffa00524> { _bfin_return_from_exception + 0x18 } RTX

   2 Target : <0xffa0050c> { _bfin_return_from_exception + 0x0 }

     Source : <0xffa005c0> { _ex_trap_c + 0x6c } JUMP.S

   3 Target : <0xffa00554> { _ex_trap_c + 0x0 }

     Source : <0xffa007f0> { _trap + 0x68 } JUMP (P4)

   4 Target : <0xffa007a8> { _trap + 0x20 }

     Source : <0xffa007a4> { _trap + 0x1c } IF !CC JUMP

   5 Target : <0xffa00788> { _trap + 0x0 }

     Source : <0x000b2f12> { _smbCalcSize_LE + 0xe } 0x6d2a

   6 Target : <0x000b2f04> { _smbCalcSize_LE + 0x0 }

     Source : <0x000b24e2> { _checkSMB + 0x1ce } CALL pcrel

   7 Target : <0x000b24e0> { _checkSMB + 0x1cc }

     Source : <0x000b24b8> { _checkSMB + 0x1a4 } IF !CC JUMP

   8 Target : <0x000b24b2> { _checkSMB + 0x19e }

     Source : <0x000b2462> { _checkSMB + 0x14e } IF !CC JUMP

   9 Target : <0x000b2452> { _checkSMB + 0x13e }

     Source : <0x000b2386> { _checkSMB + 0x72 } IF !CC JUMP

  10 Target : <0x000b2364> { _checkSMB + 0x50 }

     Source : <0x000b233e> { _checkSMB + 0x2a } IF CC JUMP

  11 Target : <0x000b2314> { _checkSMB + 0x0 }

     Source : <0x000a7f16> { _cifs_demultiplex_thread + 0x7b6 } CALL pcrel

  12 Target : <0x000a7f02> { _cifs_demultiplex_thread + 0x7a2 }

     Source : <0x000b224e> { _dump_smb + 0x102 } RTS

  13 Target : <0x000b2246> { _dump_smb + 0xfa }

     Source : <0x000b2162> { _dump_smb + 0x16 } IF !CC JUMP

  14 Target : <0x000b214c> { _dump_smb + 0x0 }

     Source : <0x000a7efe> { _cifs_demultiplex_thread + 0x79e } CALL pcrel

  15 Target : <0x000a7efa> { _cifs_demultiplex_thread + 0x79a }

     Source : <0x000a7e24> { _cifs_demultiplex_thread + 0x6c4 } IF !CC JUMP

 

Kernel Stack

Stack info:

SP: [0x03675cb8] <0x03675cb8> /* kernel dynamic memory */

FP: (0x03675fb8)

Memory from 0x03675cb0 to 03676000

03675cb0: 001ddfac  001ddfac [00000000] 00000000  3078303c  35373633  3e386263

202a2f20

03675cd0: 6e72656b  64206c65  6d616e79  6d206369  726f6d65  2f2a2079  78302000

20346336

03675cf0: 03675d80  03675cfc  0000ffff  00000000  03550ca0  0366aa20  0351f200

0351f200

03675d10:<0001110a> 03675d58  00000000  03675e34  000b2f30  000b2f14  03675d50

000b2f30

03675d30: 7fffffff  001bebac  03675d4c  03675d48 <00004958> 0351f200 <0001110a>

03675e34

03675d50: 001d9ef4  03674000  0351f200 <000055e6> 03675e34  001d9ef4  03674000

00000065

03675d70: 00000007  00000013  00000024  03675e34  03675cb8  ffffffff  03550ca0

03550f34

03675d90:<001228ca> 00030001  03674000 <00036152> 03675fb0  00000065  00000065

00000000

03675db0: 00000001  00000000  03674000  03674000  03674000  03674000  03550f50

03674000

03675dd0: 03674000  03674000  000006d6  00000000  00000000  0351f200 <000fb10a>

03675f94

03675df0: 03674000  03674000  00000000  00000000  03675f94  03509040  00015200 <

ffa0071a>

03675e10: ffa00cd4  ffe02014  00000065  0000ffff  00000001  03509040 <000f9196>

00000054

03675e30: 03674000  00000480  00008030  00000024  00000000  03675f10  00000480

000b2f14

03675e50:<000b24e6> 03509040  02002020  000f156a  ffa015e8  000f154a  ffa015e6

00000000

03675e70: 00000000  0000000e  00000000  00001ce3  00000000  00000000  00000000

00000000

03675e90: 00000000  00000000  00000000  00000000  00000000  00000000  00000000

00000000

03675eb0: 00000000  00000000  00000000  0351f0bc  2c00fc14  00000000  0351f200

03509040

03675ed0: 03674000  03674000  03509087  00000022  03509040  00000065  00000069

00000001

03675ef0: 03509040  00000b68  00000001  00000049  03509040  03509040  03509040

00000006

03675f10: 03674000  0351f200 <000a7f02> 00db8080 <000a7f1a> 00db8080  03674000

00000069

03675f30: 00000065  00000065  03675f64 <0000a256> 03675f64  00000001  00000065

00000000

03675f50: 00e79980  0351f278  03674000  03674000  0351f268  03509040  036780c0

001d9600

03675f70: 00000000  03ee98e0  0351f278  03509040  03674000  03674000  03674000

03674000

03675f90: 03674000  03675fcc  00000000  03675fb0  00000001  00000000  00000000

03674000

03675fb0: 035090a9  00000000 (00000000)<00021a3c> 000a7760  00000000  00000000

0351f200

03675fd0: 00000000  00000000  00000000  00000000  00000000  00000000 <0000144e>

00000000

03675ff0: 00000000  00000000  ffffffff  00000006

Return addresses in stack:

    address : <0x0001110a> { _printk + 0x12 }

    address : <0x00004958> { _dump_bfin_mem + 0xd4 }

    address : <0x0001110a> { _printk + 0x12 }

    address : <0x000055e6> { _trap_c + 0x452 }

    address : <0x001228ca> { _tcp_recvmsg + 0x1e2 }

    address : <0x00036152> { _get_page_from_freelist + 0x336 }

    address : <0x000fb10a> { _sock_common_recvmsg + 0x32 }

    address : <0xffa0071a> { _exception_to_level5 + 0xb2 }

    address : <0x000f9196> { _sock_recvmsg + 0x9e }

    address : <0x000b24e6> { _checkSMB + 0x1d2 }

    address : <0x000a7f02> { _cifs_demultiplex_thread + 0x7a2 }

    address : <0x000a7f1a> { _cifs_demultiplex_thread + 0x7ba }

    address : <0x0000a256> { _dequeue_task + 0x76 }

   frame  1 : <0x00021a3c> { _kthread + 0x50 }

    address : <0x0000144e> { _kernel_thread_helper + 0x6 }

Modules linked in:

Kernel panic - not syncing: Kernel exception

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