ADI schematic always plenty of 0ohms resistors. Why?

Hi,

After many years working with AD products and documents, I have decided to move forward with a question always present in my mind. Why AD datasheets are always plenty of 0ohms resistors? 

Regards,

C.J.

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    •  Analog Employees 
    Sep 22, 2021 in reply to CMartin489 +1 verified

    Hello  

    Hope you are safe and well. 

    In your example:

    • R40 allows for differential vs a single-ended signal as Del has mentioned.
    • R8 and R9 are  jumpers that connects the DAC output to either  the…
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    •  Analog Employees 
    on Sep 14, 2021 1:48 PM

    Hello,

    Most times you can think of thes as "jumpers" that can be added or removed in order to configure the evaluation board in a different way.  For example, you may want to use an external clock source are  a clock source that is included on the evaluation board.  Another example may be supplying a differential signal vs a single-ended signal. If you have a specific example you want us to answer, please let us know.

    Del

  • Hi Del,

    Thanks for your quick reply. I have a couple of examples, all of them extracted from the AD9106-ARDZ-EBZ schematic. They are R40 (short to ground), R8-R9 (they seem short 1-2 pins of JP7 and JP8 permanently) or R87 and R89 (apparently, completely useless). May I assume that all this resistors are not populated in the final PCB? Or they are actually solded using 0 ohms resistors?

    Regards,
    C.J.

  • +1
    •  Analog Employees 
    on Sep 22, 2021 8:42 AM in reply to CMartin489

    Hello  

    Hope you are safe and well. 

    In your example:

    These are usually Installed as 0 ohm resistors in the PCB unless they are identified as DNI (or Do not Install)  in the schematic. In your example,  R87/R89 is not installed in the PCB while R40 ,R8 & R9 are installed.

    Regards, 

    Lorenz

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