How can I get the PSpice model of the LTC6090, or how to convert the LTspice model to the PSpice model?

thanks

  • 0
    •  Analog Employees 
    •  Super User 
    on Nov 19, 2019 7:03 PM

    Hi stycle,

    As far as I know, the LTspice model for LTC6090 cannot be converted to a Pspice model. And I don't think there are any plans to generate a Pspice model for this device either.

    Regards,

    Hooman

  • Hi Hooman,

    It's been a while since someone asked about an LTspice model translation to PSPICE for the LTC6090.  Things have changed since then, so, I thought I would ask again.

    I had originally planned to use the ADHV4702-1 for my circuit design; it was an enabling technology with respect to our technical objectives.  I was able to design and model our circuit in LTspice, then transfer the ADHV4702-1 LTspice model to PSPICE without any problems, and was able to successfully simulate the circuit.  I was about to begin PCB layout when I found out that the ADHV4702-1 would not be available until mid-spring 2022.  The availability of the ADHV4702-1 is not timely for our project, and therefore I had to stop this part of the project and redesign the circuit to get around the ADHV4702-1 availability problems.  The next best available part I found was the LT6090, so we bought some as a hedge against future parts availability issues.

    My circuit is designed to use a moderate amount of power dissipation in general (a couple of hundred watts, boosted of course).  I was going to get a bit of a higher voltage performance from the ADHV4702-1, but using the LTC6090 will allow us to proceed with our prototype development.  I was able to redesign the circuit and successfully run the model in LTspice.  LTspice is great for getting started, and for getting a quick look at some ADI technology.  However, I want to make sure that the components in the circuit are properly selected to handle the power that we expect will be dissipated. As far as I can tell, getting power dissipation is a bit of a pain in LTspice (requires equations for each circuit element).  Importantly, OrCAD PSPICE allows me to very easily select power dissipation, and PSPICE is integrated into my complete ECAD tool set.  Therefore, LTspice has some limitations with respect to the main schematic entry, PCB layout, and simulation ECAD tools I use from Cadence.  I would like to transition my LTspice model into OrCAD, and run the design on PSPICE.  In this way I would be able to more efficiently use a single ECAD tool rather than two separate and largely incompatible tools. For me, using one tool, reduces the chances for circuit translation error and allows me to better visualize my circuit simulations.  This arrangement also allows me to easily make circuit design changes and rerun the model.

    Would it be possible for ADI to translate the LTC6090 LTspice model into a PSPICE compatible model?  I suspect that there may be others that are having parts availability issues like us, and are having to fallback to awesome circuits like the LTC6090. 

    Thank you,

    Allan

  • 0
    •  Analog Employees 
    •  Super User 
    on Jun 28, 2021 6:40 PM in reply to ahaas@hgiworld.com

    Hi Allan,

    The situation has not changed much in that we don't have a way to convert the LTC6090 LTspice model to Pspice. I'm sorry about the situation you have on your hands but I asked and could not get any help for this conversion. If the situation changes, I'll be sure to post a reply to this thread which you'll be copied on.

    Regards,

    Hooman

  • Hi Hooman,

    Thank you for your rapid reply.  I figured that might be the answer, but I thought I would put my two cents in anyway. 

    Both the LTC6090 and the ADHV4702-1 are awesome parts that address a part of the analog circuits industry that is often left out of the thought process, making circuit design more complex and challenging.  Most everyone focuses on the most common low voltage sensor interface circuits, and don't pay much attention to the other, precision based, higher voltage, and higher power applications.  These circuits make some types of technical solutions much more precise, easier to develop, and more cost effective to implement.  It may sound nutty, but there are applications that require high precision (not just low distortion and low noise) at higher voltages and powers.

    Sincerely,

    Allan

  • 0
    •  Analog Employees 
    •  Super User 
    on Jun 28, 2021 7:22 PM in reply to ahaas@hgiworld.com

    Hi Allan,

    Thanks for the feedback. I'll be sure to convey your message to my "bosses" :-)

    thanks.

    Regards,

    Hooman